Moving Closer to Family

Baby Boomers are becoming Baby Chasers, and Here’s Why

According to the data trackers at Meyers Research’s Zonda, around 25% of boomers (those born between between 1946 and 1964) are choosing to pull up roots and move closer to grandkids after retirement. There are a number of perks fueling this popular trend. Running the gamut from practical and necessary to “I just want to watch my grandkids grow!,” there’s a reason so many retirees are choosing to bid farewell to their homes and move, sometimes all the way across the country, to be closer to family. 

While getting in on the fun during those first few baby years with the grandkids is often reason enough to hit the bricks, the opportunity to discover a new community and friends with similar lifestyles is a tremendous benefit that ought not be overlooked. Whether it’s a new partner for pickleball or someone to join for whisky tastings and cigars, finding someone who shares an interest is the perfect way to break the ice in a new place. At the end of the day, grandmas and grandpas deserve a little fun, too, ya know. 

Being There for Family

Raising a family is tough business, and no one knows that better than someone who’s made it all the way through to the other side and reached that golden age of leisure we like to call retirement. It’s a time to sit back, relax, and watch the next generation of teens make ridiculous fashion choices that they’ll almost definitely laugh at when they get older. Speaking of the next generation, older kids and teens can also be a big help around the house  — another perk to living closeby. 

Chores are a great way for kids to learn household skills, and it creates moments of bonding and shared experiences which help bridge generational gaps and encourage closer relationships. Whether shoveling snow or just watching a movie together, it’s an opportunity to spend casual time together outside of busy holidays and bustling family events. The support goes both ways, too. Grandparents can be a big help with after-school childcare and on snow days, sick days, and during seasonal breaks from school. 

Deciding to move to be closer to family is easy. Deciding exactly how close is a whole other conversation. Here are some common scenarios to think about, as well as a few pros and cons to consider when making a plan to move near grandkids after retirement. 

Moving in with Family 

This is likely the most affordable option for many people, as it may allow more adults to financially contribute to the household, but there are other budget-friendly options that can offer everyone a bit more breathing room. Adding an additional dwelling onto an existing homesite can be a cost-effective way to create a completely separate living space while still having all the perks of cohabitating with family, like daily breakfasts together or being there when kids come home from school. 

There are many benefits to cohabitating, but there are some challenges to keep in mind, as well, like different sleeping and waking schedules, housekeeping styles, and general living habits. It can be hard, no matter how much love is shared, so it never hurts to keep this in mind when considering living with loved ones. 

Buying a Separate Home

For those looking to be closer to family, but still wanting to retain privacy and autonomy, a  separate home is the best option. Using the profits from the sale of a previous home often means that a buyer has a budget which affords more options and even greater amenities that may not have been accessible previously. Gated communities are a popular option among boomers, as they provide a higher level of security and often include lifestyle amenities, like tennis courts, swimming pools, and clubhouses with resident events  — not to mention golf courses, gyms, and other resident perks which afford opportunities to get to know neighbors and build a sense of belonging within the neighborhood. 

Buying a Home Together 

Parents and grandparents looking to find a home for multigenerational living can choose to pool resources and purchase a larger home or one with an additional dwelling unit (ADU)  — a “mother-in-law suite,” as they’re commonly called. This option brings all the perks and challenges mentioned above; it’s also an opportunity to plan for the family’s future through smart real estate investments which can help support long-term financial goals and building assets to pass down to future generations. 

Here are a few examples of homes for sale with separate apartments and ADUs in Oregon and SW Washington. If you see something you like, or just want to know more about multigenerational homes, give us a call today for more information. 

Manzanita Separate Suite
Bend Extra Studio Unit
ADU in Tigard
Separate ADU in Washougal
Room for family on 12 acres in Sisters

Making the First Move

If you’re shopping for a new home, a shared home, or just curious to know what’s available near your kids and grandkids, the first step is to contact a reputable real estate agency which can guide you toward the best options in your desired area. Realtors are not just home experts, they’re local fixtures and ambassadors for the community. Getting to know a new place can seem overwhelming, but having a great realtor by your side can make it a little bit easier and a lot more enjoyable. 


Contact Cascade Sotheby’s now to explore homes for sale in Central Oregon, the Portland area, along the Columbia River Gorge, at the Oregon Coast, and in SW Washington.


Brian Ladd on The Jennifer Hammond Show

Our very own Brian Ladd spoke with Jennifer Hammond of The Jennifer Hammond Show on SiriusXM to talk about the state of real estate in Bend and everything the city has to offer!  Listen to the full interview above, or click here.